The Books

"When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, also the books, and above all the parchments." - (2 Timothy 4:13)

 

Currently Reading

Letter to the Romans, Second Edition

Censored

Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

The Conservative Mind: From Burke to Eliot

 

Next Up

The Instrumental University

 

Recently Completed

Under Red Skies

The Great Firewall of China

Christ's Call to Reform the Church

The World in a Grain

 

Magazines

MIT Technology Review

Communications of the ACM

The New Criterion

Foreign Affairs


Thoughts for the Quiet Hour (March 14)

He that eateth me, even he shall live by me

John 6:57

 

To feed on Christ is to get His strength into us to be our strength. You feed on the cornfield, and the strength of the cornfield comes into you, and is your strength. You feed on Christ, and then go and live your life; and it is Christ in you that lives your life, that helps the poor, that tells the truth, that fights the battles, and that wins the crown.

Phillips Brooks

 

Source: Thoughts for the Quiet Hour  (Logos Bible Software)

 


China Reading List

Under Red Skies

The Great Firewall of China: How to Build and Control an Alternative Version of the Internet

China's Global Identity: Considering the Responsibilities of Great Power

In Line Behind a Billion People

Red Flags: Why Xi's China Is in Jeopardy

The Problem with Xi’s China Model

End of an Era: How China's Authoritarian Revival is Undermining Its Rise

AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order

China's Great Wall of Debt: Shadow Banks, Ghost Cities, Massive Loans, and the End of the Chinese Miracle

Foreign Affairs (January/February 2019)

MIT Technology Review (January/February 2019, The China Issue)

Public Intellectuals in the Global Arena: Professors or Pundits? [The Public Intellectual in China by Willy Lam]

From Benito Mussolini to Hugo Chavez: Intellectuals and a Century of Political Hero Worship [Western Intellectuals, Mao's China, and Cambodia under Pol Pot)


Mars Hill Audio Journal (Volume 142)

Guests on Volume 142: Stanley Hauerwas, on writing letters to his godson about the virtues; Perry L. Glanzer and Nathan F. Alleman, on the fragmentation of modern higher education and why we need theology to unify universities; Jeffrey Bishop, on how modern medicine shapes an inadequate understanding of the human body; Alan Jacobs, on how contemporary communications media discourage charitable thinking; D. C. Schindler, on the diabolical nature of the modern understanding of freedom; and Marianne Wright, on how the gospel comes through in the writings of George MacDonald.


Any Way Will Do?

Sometimes we make dealing with the current controversial features of Christianity more difficult than it actually needs to be. Here I’m talking about politically charged theological and ethical issues like abortion, homosexuality, same-sex marriage, gender dysphoria, and the like. In one important sense they’re not hard at all; they’re easy.

Some ideas flow so naturally and directly from clear, core elements of the Christian worldview that they are not “tough” issues in a scriptural sense. The relevant texts are clear. There is no ambiguity in the Bible’s teaching. The basic doctrines informing these issues are not gray areas. They never have been.

The confusion comes almost completely from the outside, not the inside. Lots of folks—including Christians—simply don’t like what the Bible teaches, so they wrangle about words and twist the text trying to get the verses to say the opposite of what they clearly mean.


Evolution

Whenever you come across the topic of evolution, ask a simple question: What definition of evolution is being used? Since evolution has at least three different meanings, it’s essential to know which one is being invoked.

 

For evolution to be a fact, you must have two things, minimally. First, you've got to have life coming from non-life--abiogenesis. Second, you've got to have a change in that life from simple forms to complex forms over time. You must have the kick-off, and you must have the rest of the game.


Thoughts for the Quiet Hour (December 19)

A hearer of the word … a doer of the work

James 1:23, 25

Religion may be learned on Sunday, but it is lived in the weekday’s work. The torch of religion may be lit in the church, but it does its burning in the shop and on the street. Religion seeks its life in prayer, but it lives its life in deeds. It is planted in the closet, but it does its growing out in the world. It plumes itself for flight in songs of praise, but its actual flights are in works of love. It resolves and meditates on faithfulness as it reads its Christian lesson in the Book of Truth, but “faithful is that faithful does.” It puts its armor on in all the aids and helps of the sanctuary as its dressingroom, but it combats for the right, the noble, and the good in all the activities of practical existence, and its battle ground is the whole broad field of life.

John Doughty

 

Source: Thoughts for the Quiet Hour, Logos Bible Software

 


Cranmer on Christ

From Archbishop Cranmer:

People no longer feel they need to be saved, and that’s the problem. If there is no hell, no eternal damnation, no separation from God, then Jesus is of no more significance than any other professing prophet: he is just a wise man who did some good things. But ‘God’ and ‘Saviour’ he patently isn’t, and who cares anyway as long as you’re happy and nice to people? And here’s where Christians waffle on about Christology and soteriology and vicarious satisfaction – more Greek – and by so doing we neglect to love, to show people Jesus, to live our lives in relationship with the One who was born in Bethlehem and taught us that we must become incarnations of him – little christs, morally set apart, striving to do good.


Psalm 2

God’s Promise to His Anointed
(Acts 4:23–31)


1 Why do the nations conspire,
and the peoples plot in vain?
2 The kings of the earth set themselves,
and the rulers take counsel together,
against the LORD and his anointed, saying,
3 “Let us burst their bonds asunder,
and cast their cords from us.”

4 He who sits in the heavens laughs;
the LORD has them in derision.
5 Then he will speak to them in his wrath,
and terrify them in his fury, saying,
6 “I have set my king on Zion, my holy hill.”

7 I will tell of the decree of the LORD:
He said to me, “You are my son;
today I have begotten you.
8 Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage,
and the ends of the earth your possession.
9 You shall break them with a rod of iron,
and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.”

10 Now therefore, O kings, be wise;
be warned, O rulers of the earth.
11 Serve the LORD with fear,
with trembling 12 kiss his feet,
or he will be angry, and you will perish in the way;
for his wrath is quickly kindled.

Happy are all who take refuge in him.

 

Source: The Holy Bible: New Revised Standard Version. (1989). (Ps 2:1–12). Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers.